Why In-Home Care

We know that good experiences in early learning help our children build a strong foundation for becoming lifelong, confident learners.

Bright Futures provides children (0-5) with in home environments that are nurturing, safe and secure.

The question of which is better, home based or childcare centres is not a one size fits all. So at Bright Futures we encourage you to think about what’s important to you when it comes to your child’s early learning and care. Think about what suits your child, are they a child that needs a lot of one on one attention or are they pretty happy in independent play?

Of course if you are looking for childcare for a baby, those questions aren’t easily answered yet so here we suggest thinking about your preferences as a family. What type of environment do you want for your child? Do you want one consistent person to care for your child, day in day out, or do you want them to be exposed to lots of teachers and other adults?

The home based versus centre based debate is not a case of one being better than the other, it’s just that some children will thrive in a busy environments, others do well when the pace is a bit slower. As with different adult personality types, some children enjoy large groups, others may find the intensity of large groups draining, and some adapt well to different teachers while others like the consistency of one person they can bond closely with.

If you are considering home based care for your child here are some of the main advantages it can have over centres:

  • – Activities like supermarket shopping, library visits, going to the post office or trips to the park can provide valuable learning experiences for children and a fresh change of scenery.
  • – Outings, playgroups and excursions offer variety whilst the home like environment offers stability
  • – Your child’s own routine is maintained
  • – Education is predictable, calm, familiar, in an environment builds trust
  • – Hours are more flexible
  • – Smaller ratios of teacher to children – 1:4 maximum
  • – A closer carer to child bond is likely
  • – Often fewer cases of illnesses since the child is exposed to fewer children
  • – Mixed age groups allowing for more sibling interaction
  • – Lower fees

Tips for choosing the right caregiver for your child:

  • – Trust your gut, you will know when the chemistry is right
  • – Ask lots of questions, you don’t want to leave with any insecurities about the care for your child
  • – Visit homebased Educarers and even centres, it will take time but will help you realise what you do/don’t like
  • – Be certain you can trust those on your shortlist
  • – Remember, its OK to change your mind. Really it is… OK!

Still have questions? Of course you do, give one of our Visiting Teachers a call – we’re happy to talk through anything and everything when it comes to the early childhood education and care for our communities Tamariki. Contact us here.

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“Bright Futures childcare and learning is a service of Napier Family Centre, an award winning not for profit social service agency. Any surpluses we make go right back in, to help provide a better service to our local communities.”